Monday, July 12, 2010

Against liberalism: a surprising, multi-ethnic array of antagonists of neoliberal globalization is coalescing against the "progressives"

From:
Against the Armies of the Night: The Aurora Movements

(Occidental Observer) -- by Michael O'Meara --

The single greatest force shaping our age is unquestionably globalization.

Based on the transnationalization of American capital and the worldwide imposition of American market relations combined with new technologies, globalization has not only reshaped the world's national economies, it's provoked a dizzying array of oppositional movements, on the right and the left, that, despite their divergent ideologies and goals, seek to defend native or traditional identities from the market's ethnocidal effects.

In the vast literature on globalization and its various antiglobalist movements, Charles Lindholm's and José Pedro Zúquete's The Struggle for the World (Stanford University Press, 2010) is the first to look beyond the specific political designations of these different antiglobalist tendencies to emphasize the common redemptive, identitarian, and populist character they share.

The "left wing, right wing, and no wing" politics of these antiglobalists are by no means dismissed, only subordinated to what Lindholm and Zúquete see as their more prominent redemptive dimension. In this spirit, they refer to them as "aurora movements," promising a liberating dawn from the nihilistic darkness that comes with the universalization of neoliberal market forms.

Focusing on the way antiglobalists imagine salvation from neoliberalism's alleged evils, the authors refrain from judging the morality or validity of the different movements they examine — endeavoring, instead, to grasp the similarities "uniting" them.

They abstain thus from the present liberal consensus, which holds that history has come to an end and that the great ideological battles of the past have given way now to an order based entirely on the technoeconomic imperatives specific to the new global market system.

The result of this ideologically neutral approach is a work surprisingly impartial and sympathetic in its examination of European, Islamic, and Latin American antiliberalism...

Given also that liberalism (or neoliberalism) ideologically undergirds the world system and that this system has been on life-support at least since the financial collapse of late 2008, it seems not unreasonable to suspect that the fate of liberalism and globalism are themselves now linked and that we may be approaching another axial age in which the established liberal ideologies and systems are forced to give way to the insurgence of new ones.

But perhaps the cruelest implication of all is the dilemma Lindholm/Zuqúete's argument poses to U.S. rightists. For European new rightists, Islamic jihadists, and Bolivian revolutionaries alike, globalization is a form not only of liberalization but of "Americanization."

And there's no denying the justice of seeing the struggle against America as the main front in the worldwide antiglobalist struggle: for the United States was the world's first and foremost liberal state and is the principal architect of the present global system.

At the same time, it's also the case that native Americans — i.e., European Americans — have themselves fallen victim to what now goes for "Americanism" — in the form of unprotected borders, Third World colonization, de-industrialization, political correctness, multiculturalism, creedal identities, anti-Christianism, the media's on-going spiritual colonization — and all the other degradations distinct to our age.

One wonders, then, if a right worthy of the designation will ever intersect an America willing to fight "Americanism" — and its shadow-casting Armies — in the name of some suppressed antiliberal impulse in the country's European heritage...MORE...LINK

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